WORLD OF TEXT

Posts Tagged ‘Germany

Hallo. Hello. Hola. Salut everyone. The time has come to say goodbye. It’s already my last week at the translation firm WORLD TEXT. I started my internship on January 07. Three months have passed so fast!

So, let me tell you a bit about my experience.

I have to say, it was one of the best internships – and I’ve done a lot of those.

My tasks:

I sometimes had to fit the cliché and make coffee 😛 At 9.30 every morning I had to go to the post office and to the bank.

Most of the time I was proofreading various texts, once even an entire user’s manual.

When I found something “suspicious”, I was allowed to add a comment in the document and send it back to the translator, who then answered my question/corrected the corresponding part of the translation. This was the task I liked most! I deepened my knowledge of languages; it was interesting to learn how translators – native speakers – expressed certain phrases and which word they used for a certain term. Sometimes I added comments that didn’t necessarily relate to the text, I just wanted to know things like: “Could you also use that word instead of this word?” or “I’d write the place first, which possibility is more common?” I enjoyed discussing with the translators.

Proofreading was also a gain for my general knowledge. The texts I read were so diverse – from contracts and deeds to brochures about enterprises in the meat industry to articles about marketing and advertising.

Sometimes I had to do “blind proofreading”, i. e. proofreading a text in a language I don’t know and checking it for mistakes in numbers etc. This showed me once again how many different languages there are in the world. I often found similarities in certain languages, too.

Of course I was allowed to translate/prepare some texts myself 🙂

I also did internet research and updated the terminology databases.

AND I posted various articles here on the WORLD TEXT blog.

I hope you enjoyed reading my blog entries!

I don’t know when the next intern will follow and if/how much they’ll post on here – but I’ll definitely stay tuned – and you should, too!!! 😛

If you’re interested in a WORLD TEXT internship yourself, don’t hesitate to contact them, they’ve had interns from all over the world: info@worldtext.com

Don’t forget to visit the website: www.worldtext.com

Yup, that was it.

Tschüss! Bye-bye! Adiós! Salut!

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Hi everyone!

Today I have another interesting topic for you. Have you been “stereotyped” or do you “stereotype” certain people yourself?

I have to admit, I also do stereotype. I think it’s hard to avoid. When I have to deal with certain people and they all behave the same and then, later, I meet another person, I can’t help stereotyping this person. But it’s only because of the experience I’ve had so far, and the more people behave according to a specific stereotype, the more difficult it is to not do it.

There are certain kinds of stereotypes:

men & women

Men are strong and do all the work

Men who spend too much time on the computer or read are geeks

All men are interested in cars

Men don’t do housework and they’re not responsible for taking care of children

They don’t cook

Men like sports and video games

Men are in charge, they’re always at the top

As husbands, men tell their wives what to do

Men are messy

Men are good at math

It is always men who work in science, engineering and other technical fields

 

Women are supposed to have „clean jobs“ such as secretaries or teachers

Women don’t play sports

Women are supposed to cook and do housework and raise children

They don’t have technical skills and are not good at „hands on“ projects such as car repairs

Women are supposed to look pretty and be looked at

They’re only interested in their physical appearance

 

I disapprove all of those, except the first one. Men are stronger, by nature.

 

groups of individuals

Punks wear mohawks, spikes, chains, are a menace to society and are always getting in trouble

Goths wear black clothes, black makeup, are depressed and hated by society

All politicians are philanders and think only of personal gain and benefit

And so on. I don’t want to go into further detail here, we’ll take a closer look at…

cultures

Let’s start with the Germans 🙂

Stereotypes are:

Beer and sausage lovers. -> True 😛 I’d also say coffee lovers.

Lederhosen. -> Nope. Only at events like the Oktoberfest

I guess I have to mention that…

Nazis. -> HELL NO. Is this a widespread German stereotype?

Organized and disciplined, punctual etc. -> Punctual definitely. The rest…hmm… We also demonstrate and complain a lot, so I’d say it depends. Workaholics? No.

Soccer. -> Most men yes. Most women no. (I’m an exception J) But during a world championship all women want to be the biggest soccer fans. I hate that.

Do you know more German stereotypes?

 

If you want, you can post a comment and follow my example:

I’ll pick 4 countries.

America.

The first 5 things that come into my mind when I think of the USA. I’m honest.

1. guns 2. melting pot 3. fascinating cities 4. fast food 5. celebrities

The UK.

1. London 2. Queen 3. the English language 4. Darts 5.red telephone boxes & buses

African continent.

1. poverty 2. zest for life 3. desert 4. AIDS 5. wildlife

Italy.

1. pasta 2. euro crisis 3. mafia 4. pizza 5. climate

 

I consciously chose these four, and I assume that many people would post the same/something similar.

You have to visit the country, and meet lots of people, to get an idea of the culture and mentality. There are so many things to learn that you didn’t expect before.

To stereotype doesn’t have to be something negative, though we should try not to do it – everyone is individual.

Hello, it’s me, Madeleine, the new intern at WORLD TEXT.

I’m going through some files and found some interesting texts. I found gap fill tests on English business expressions. I already learned some of them during my apprenticeship as foreign langauge correspondent, but most of the idioms are new to me. So I’ve decided to list them (English -> German). 

1.
to be hard-nosed -> kompromisslos/pragmatisch/abgebrüht sein
Example: „He’s the perfect person to take on this job. He’s a really hard-nosed person and won’t stand for any nonsense.“
2.
fat cats -> überbezahlter Topmanager/Bonze/Geldsack
Example: „We have to work hard for our money while the fat cats in the city make money doing very little.“
3.
high flyer/high-flyer -> Aktie mit extremem Wertanstieg/Senkrechtstarter/Höhenflieger
Example: „She’s obviously going to get a job soon. She’s a real high-flyer.“
4.
to do a roaring trade -> ein Bomben-/Riesengeschäft machen
Example: „The product has been a great success. We’re doing a roaring trade in it.“
5.
to cook the books -> die Bilanzen/(Bücher) verschleiern/fälschen
Example: „Their accounts were completely phoney. They had been cooking the books for years.“
6.
earth-shattering -> weltbewegend/welterschütternd
Example: „Well I’m not surprised they’re in a mess. It’s not exactly earth-shattering news.“
7.
big fish in a little pond -> „großer Fisch in kleinem Teich“; siehe auch „Fischteicheffekt“
Example: „He thinks he is really important, but he is just a big fish in a little pond.“
8.
to run a tight ship -> den Laden fest im Griff haben
Example: „She’s an excellent manager. She runs a really tight ship.“
9.
to make a killing -> ein Riesengeschäft machen/abkassieren/einen Mordsgewinn machen
Example: „I bought them cheap and sold them for a lot. I really made a killing.“
10.
golden handshake -> goldener Handschlag/hohe Abfindung
Example: „Tom was forced to leave his job, but he got a very generous golden handshake.“
11.
to have one’s hand in the till -> sich an der Kasse/am Geld des Arbeitgebers vergreifen
Example: „The accountant had stolen a lot of money. He had had his hand in the till for years.“
12.
to be a big shot -> ein hohes Tier sein
Example: „John doesn’t look very impressive, but he’s one of the big shots in this industry.“
13.
to hang up one’s hat -> seine Arbeit niederlegen
Example: „I’ve had enough. I’m going to hang up my hat and retire.“
14.
money-spinner -> Renner/Kassenschlager
Example: „You can make a lot of money selling this product. It’s a real money-spinner.“
15.
to stay ahead of the pack -> der Konkurrenz immer eine Nasenlänge voraus sein
Example: „If you want to succeed in the business, you need to always stay ahead of the pack.
16.
to drive a hard bargain -> hart verhandeln
Example: „It’s hard doing business with Maggie. She drives a hard bargain.“
17.
to corner the market -> den Markt beherrschen
Example: „He’s the only person who imports this product. He has really cornered the market.“
18.
to cut a deal -> einen Kompromiss eingehen/eine Vereinbarung treffen
Example: „We’re both competing for the same business. Perhaps we can cut a deal to share out the work.“
19.
to be on the make -> auf Geld aus sein/profitgierig/karrieresüchtig sein
Example: „I wouldn’t trust Harry an inch. He’s definitely someone who is on the make.“
20.
to make it -> es schaffen
Example: „Now that I’ve got a million pounds/dollars in savings, I really feel I’ve made it.“

 

 

My name is Madeleine and I come from Bavaria, Germany.

I’m doing an internship here at WORLD TEXT from Jan 07 until March 30. I can speak German, English, Spanish and French. I’m a foreign language correspondent and as I haven’t gained any job experience so far, I hope to improve my language skills and learn new things here at WORLD TEXT. I’m writing in English because I hope to get more people interested in this translation firm 🙂 Especially when you’re from abroad, an internship at WORLD TEXT is a great opportunity to perfect your German and learn more about our country, Schwerin and its magnificent castle.

My grandmother’s relatives live here and they told me about the firm, that’s how I heard about WORLD TEXT. Regarding accommodation, there are many facilities where you can stay (at a reasonable price) – now I have to do proofreading (Spanish -> German), so see you later!!!

Germans are known to worry about unnecessary things all the time. In English-speaking countries, this phenomenon is called „German angst“.
German angst
I have to admit that there might be some truth in it. There is indeed a tendency in this country to panic about things that leave other nationalities rather unimpressed.

According to a long-term study by an insurance company, the top 5 fears of Germans in the year 2009 were:

1. decline of the economic climate(66%)
2. higher unemployment(65%)
3. cost of living increase(63%)
4. natural disaster(56%)
5. nursing care when you’re old (54%)

Higher unemployment has been a fairly popular fear for years, as well as cost of living increase. What are you scared of?
What are your top five fears?

Britta

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Being in contact with the English language-reading articles or books, watching movies in English- you will – as a German native speaker- at some point encounter German words looking pretty awkward to you in the English context.
A lot of loanwords illustrate German food clichés such as „knackwurst“ and „sauerkraut“.
Bratwurst mit Sauerkraut
Others are, of course, taken from the 3rd Reich (oops- another loanword) like „blitzkrieg“ and „fuehrer“. And then you have those words referring to Germany’s more pleasant image as the country of poets and philosophers: „wahlverwandtschaft“, „weltanschauung“ and „bildungsroman“.
I kind of like „lumpenproletariat“, „alpenglow“ from the German word „Alpenglühen“ and of course, „frauleinwunder“.
I think that „verboten“ also sounds quite funny if you pronounce it the English way in a sentence like „Certain phrases are verboten.“ (BBC News) or “There is a reason why Rudy Giuliani is, in early polls, the surprising leader for the GOP nomination in 2008, even though he is pro-choice, pro-gay rights and many other verboten things.” (Newsweek Online, 4. September 2005).
Kitsch at it's best
Another word „stolen“ from German is „kitsch“, frequently used in contexts such as “the kitschy title sounds a warning gong at once” (Time, 15. September 1980, S. 51) or „[…] and it is kitsch art of the highest order.“ (BBC News).
Do you know any examples of German loanwords in English or other languages?

Britta

Ok, let’s have a look:

When do you get up in the morning?
What colour are your walls?
What is your favourite book?
How often do you have sex?
How much alcohol do you drink?
Dirndl und Maß?

According to a study published in the „Spiegel“ in spring this year, Frau and Herr Average from Germany get up at 6.23 am, Herr Germany drinks 540 glasses of alcohol and his wife half of that. In addition, the German couple has sex every third day and both enjoy reading Joanne K. Rowling’s best seller Harry Potter. They drive a Golf.
They usually paint their walls yellow and decorate with pictures of animals and the family.
For holiday they usually travel to another part of Germany. But if they go to another country then it’s Mallorca, and of course they take their only child “Alexander Müller” with them.
As for food, they have lunch every day at 12 noon and their favourite meals are “curry wurst”, “Spaetzle” and “Schnitzel”. They buy these at discount supermarkets such as Lidl and Aldi because for them, the most important aspect is that the food is cheap.
“Mensch” by Groenemeyer is their favourite song and they enjoy watching TV (more than three hours per day!).

But this study also found out that most Germans like to say they’re individuals. Nobody wants to be seen as a stereotype and especially not a German beer drinking, serious and Golf-driving pessimist.

Do the results of this study surprise you?

Personally, I like reading Harry Potter, too. I like Spätzle (naturally, coming from Baden-Württemberg). I usually buy groceries at Lidl (for financial reasons). But I would never ever paint my walls yellow and I am not particularly keen on beer, either.

What kind of German are you? Or in case you’re from a different country – how do you see the Germans?
And what do you think of slogans like “Geiz ist geil” or “Du bist Deutschland”?

Britta

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