WORLD OF TEXT

Posts Tagged ‘Loddar

Hey everyone. Fips inspired me to post another blog entry about German idioms. Like you all know, we Germans are crazy about sausage (True? Another interesting blog entry will follow, so stay tuned!), so we also have many idoms about sausage.

I already posted – “Alles hat ein Ende, nur die Wurst hat zwei” and “noch in Abrahams Wurstkessel sein“. Let’s go on with…

1. Das ist (mir) (doch) wurst!!

Informal expression. Used a lot. Often pronounced “des is mir wurscht” (depends on the region I guess). I’d translate it as “I don’t give a ****”. If you want to be more polite, you say “Das ist (mir) egal” – “It doesn’t matter”/”I don’t care”.

2. Die beleidigte Leberwurst spielen

Literally “to play the offended liverwurst/liver sausage”. I found “to be a sorehead” as an appropriate translation.

3. Extrawurst

Means “a special/an additional sausage”. Either used as “jemandem eine Extrawurst braten” – “to fry a special/an additional sausage for someone” or “eine Extrawurst bekommen/kriegen” – “to get a special/an additional sausage”.

Example: “Alle anderen arbeiten bis 17 Uhr und du bekommst keine Extrawurst, nur weil du die Nichte vom Chef bist.” (“Everyone else works until 5 pm and you won’t get a special/an additional sausage just because you’re the boss’s niece.”)

4. Es geht um die Wurst

Literally „it’s going around the sausage“. For this I found “it’s neck or nothing” and “it’s crunch-time”.

5. herumwursteln/verwurstelt

I found “to muddle along” for “herumwursteln” and “tangled” for “verwurstelt” (informal for “verheddert”). I can’t find a German word which is more elegant and expresses exactly the same as ”herumwursteln”.

Example: “Ich habe mit all den Kabeln herumgwurstelt und am Ende waren sie alle verwurstelt.” (“I was sausaging around with all those cables, and at the end they were all miss-sausaged.”)

6. Wurstfinger

What’s the most common, ”fat fingers”? “Stubby fingers”? “Podgy fingers”? Anyways, not very nice :O

7. In der Not schmeckt die Wurst auch ohne Brot

Literally „In times of misery, the sausage tastes good even without bread”. Similar to “beggars can’t be choosers” and “Hunger makes hard beans sweet”.

8. Hanswurst/Hans Wurst

Literally “Hans Sausage”. Translation: “tomfool”. I’d say this expression is not very common. I guess almost everyone knows it, but it’s not used very often.

Example: “Was will dieser Hanswurst hier?!” (“What does this Hans Sausage want here?!”)

9. Wer anderen eine Bratwurst brät, hat ein Bratwurstbratgerät

Last but not least. This is a saying just for fun and derives from “The one who digs a pit will fall into it” (“Wer anderen eine Grube gräbt, fällt selbst hinein”). Is this a common idiom in English? If not, the equivalent is “Harm set harm get”.

So, back to the actual saying, the translation for this one is “The one who fries a bratwurst for others has a bratwurst-frying-device” 🙂

That’s the end of this blog entry and also of the “idiom series”, there’s gonna be something different next time!

(Something else, just for fun, to test how perfect your German is. I just found this, amazing :D)

  • Wer andern eine Bratwurst brät, hat ein Bratwurstbratgerät!
  • Wer anderen das Bratwurstbratgerät zersägt, hat ein Bratwurstbratgerätzersäggerät
  • Wer anderen ein Bratwurstbratgerätzersäggerät baut, hat meist ein Bratwurstbratgerätzersäggerätbaugerät (umgangssprachlich: BWBGZGBG)
  • Wer anderen ein Bratwurstbratgerätzersäggerätbaugerät zerstört, hat meist ein Bratwurstbratgerätzersäggerätbaugerätzerstörgerät (umgangssprachlich: BWBGZGBGZG)
  • Wer anderen ein Bratwurstbratgerätzersäggerätbaugerätzerstörgerät baut, hat meist ein Bratwurstbratgerätzersäggerätbaugerätzerstörgerätbaugerät (umgangssprachlich: BWBGZGBGZGBG)
  • Wer anderen ein Bratwurstbratgerätzersäggerätbaugerätzerstörgerätbaugerät zersägt, hat meist ein Bratwurstbratgerätzersäggerätbaugerätzerstörgerätbaugerätzersäggerät (umgangssprachlich: BWBGZGBGZGBGZG)
Advertisements

Hallo zusammen 🙂

It’s time for another blog entry. As German is my mother tongue and Fips has been the only person commenting on here (thank you :-)), I decided to post a second part of “Funny idioms – German”. Here we go.

Bild

1. etwas in den Sand setzen

„to put sth in the sand“ -> to muck/mess something up

Example 1: „Jim has put the Math test in the sand.“

(Jim hat die Matheprüfung in den Sand gesetzt.)

Example 2: “The company has put €10,000 in the sand.”

(Die Firma hat 10.000 € in den Sand gesetzt.)

Bild

2. auf dem Schlauch stehen

„to be standing on the hose“ -> to not get it/to be stuck/to get one’s wires crossed

I think it’s not a synonym to “only understand station”, because this “hose idiom” is used when something is really obvious/clear as daylight and everyone else has understood it.

Example: “Number ‘3’ is the correct answer?! … Oh gosh, of course!! I was completely standing on the hose!”

(Nummer 3 ist die richtige Antwort?! … Oh mann, natürlich!! Ich stand total auf dem Schlauch!“)

Bild

3. sich etwas abschminken

„to take sth off“ („to remove one’s makeup“) -> synonym to “have cut oneself” -> to have to go without sth.

Example: “If you don’t study now, you can take off the party tonight!”

(Wenn du jetzt nicht lernst, kannst du dir die Party heute Abend abschminken!)

Bild

4. noch in Abrahams Wurstkessel sein

„to be still in Abraham’s sausage pot” -> to be not yet born

Example: “When the war was taking place, you were still in Abraham’s sausage pot.”

(Als der Krieg war, warst du noch in Abrahams Wurstkessel.)

Bild

5. in den sauren Apfel beißen

„to bite into the sour apple“ -> to swallow the bitter pill/to bite the bullet

Example: “I don’t want to spend the whole weekend working but I guess I’ll just have to bite into the sour apple.”

(Ich will nicht das ganze Wochenende mit arbeiten verbringen, aber ich denke da werde ich wohl in den sauren Apfel beißen müssen.)

Bild

6. aus einer Mücke einen Elefanten machen

„to make an elephant out of a gnat” -> to make a mountain out of a molehill

Example: “The two friends argue a lot, mostly they make an elephant out of a gnat.”

(Die zwei Freunde streiten sich oft, meistens machen sie aus einer Mücke einen Elefanten.)

Bild

7. auf Wolke Sieben schweben/sein

I know, Valentine’s Day is already over, but here the correspondent idiom!

“to float/be on cloud seven” -> to be on cloud nine

So as you see, Germans are 2 clouds below 😉 Is anyone on cloud eight? Hahaha!

Example: “She has a boyfriend now and she’s floating on cloud seven.”

(Sie hat jetzt einen Freund und schwebt auf Wolke sieben.)

Do you use the English version only for love or for happiness in general?

Bild

8. zum Mäusemelken sein

„to be for mouse-milking“ -> “to be enough to make you crazy”

Example: “The computer program is hanging all the time – it’s for mouse-milking!”

(Das Computerprogramm hängt andauernd – es ist zum Mäusemelken!)

Bild

9. auf der Matte stehen

„to stand on the mat“ -> to be on the spot and ready for action

Example: “For this job you have to stand on the mat at 4 am”.

(Für diesen Job musst du um 4 Uhr früh auf der Matte stehen.)

Bild

10. nicht auf den Mund gefallen sein

„someone didn’t fall on his/her mouth“ -> to have a quick tongue/to have the gift of the gab

Example: “Sarah told them right away what things could be changed about the event. She really didn’t fall on her mouth.”

(Sarah hat ihnen gleich gesagt, was sie am Event ändern könnten. Sie ist wirklich nicht auf den Mund gefallen.)

Bild

11. Bleib/Geh hin, wo der Pfeffer wächst!

„stay/go where the pepper grows“ -> go jump in the lake

Example: „It‘s really getting too colorful to me now. Do what you want and go where the pepper grows!”

(Das wird mir jetzt echt zu bunt. Mach was du willst und geh hin, wo der Pfeffer wächst!)

Bild

12. die Sau rauslassen

„to let the sow out” -> to paint the town red

Example: “Our final exams are finally over. Let’s paint the town red tonight!”

(Unsere Abschlussprüfungen sind endlich vorbei. Lasst uns heute Abend die Sau rauslassen!)

Bild

13. Das kommt nicht in die Tüte!

„This doesn’t come into the bag!” -> “This is out of the question!”; synonym to no. 3 “to take sth off”

Example: “You want to go to a party tonight?! After you put your Math test in the sand?! This doesn’t come into the bag!”

(Du willst heute Abend auf eine Party! Nachdem du deine Matheprüfung in den Sand gesetzt hast?! Das kommt nicht in die Tüte!)

Bild

14. die Nase voll (von etwas) haben

„to have one’s nose full of sth” -> to be fed up with sth

Example: “I have my nose full of rising electricity prices!”

(Ich hab die Nase voll von steigenden Stromkosten!)

Instead of „nose“, you can also say „snout“, but this sounds way ruder.

That’s the end of this blog entry, I hope you liked it, please leave a comment (everyone :P).

Have a nice weekend!

Hey everyone. So today it’s time for the German idioms! Let’s start right off, I know you’re curious!! 🙂 Which of the following do you already know?

Bild

1. sich in den Arsch/Hintern beißen

“to bite oneself in the ass/butt” -> to kick oneself (“ass” is more common, but also more colloquial)

Example: “I bought the product for 70 euros, and one shop later I saw exactly the same one, but for 52 euros only. I could bite myself in the butt!”

(Ich habe das Produkt für 70 Euro gekauft, und im Laden danach sah ich genau dasselbe, aber für nur 52 Euro. Ich könnte mich in den Arsch/Hintern beißen!)

Bild

2. nur Bahnhof verstehen

“to only understand station” -> It’s all Greek to someone

Example: “The Math teacher was talking about the text problem, and we said ‘Could you explain it again, please? We only understand station!”

(Der Mathelehrer redete über die Sachaufgabe. Wir sagten „Könnten Sie es bitte nochmal erklären? Wir verstehen nur Bahnhof!“)

We have another idiom with a similar meaning: “It sounds Spanish to me”

Bild

3. Hals- und Beinbruch!

“Neck and leg fracture!” -> Good luck!/Break a leg!

Example: “Neck and leg fracture for the job interview!”

(Hals- und Beinbruch für das Vorstellungsgespräch!)

Bild

4. bekannt sein wie ein bunter Hund

„to be as known as a colorful dog” -> to be well-known/to be known all over the place

Example: “Everyone here knows him. He’s as known as a colorful dog.”

(Jeder hier kennt ihn. Er ist bekannt wie ein bunter Hund.)

Bild

5. jemandem zu bunt werden

„to become/get too colorful to someone” -> to go too far/someone’s patience snaps

Example: “Normally our English teacher is a patient person, but that lesson was such a mess. He shouted ‘This is getting too colorful to me here, either you all shut up and do your work or there’ll be a hail of expulsions from school!’”

(Normalerweise ist unser Englischlehrer sehr geduldig, aber diese Stunde war total chaotisch. Er brüllte: „Das wird mir hier zu bunt, entweder seid ihr alle ruhig und macht eure Aufgaben oder es hagelt Verweise!“)

Bild

6. einen Besen fressen

„to gorge a broom“ -> to eat one’s hat

Example: “If FC Nuremberg wins against Bayern Munich, I’ll gorge a broom!”

(Wenn der FC Nürnberg gegen Bayern München gewinnt, fresse ich einen Besen!)

(I think you use this idiom to say that, if something happens, you’ll be very surprised, but glad. (So I’d be very glad if Munich lost against Nuremberg :-))

Bild

7. blau machen

“to do blue” -> to play hooky/take a mental health day/skip work

Example: “I don’t like going to school/work tomorrow. I think I’ll do blue for a day.”

(Ich habe morgen keine Lust auf Schule/Arbeit. Ich denke ich werde einen Tag blau machen.)

Bild

8. (auf etwas) keinen Bock (mehr) haben

„to have no billy goat/buck… (anymore) (on something)” -> to not feel like something/someone can’t be bothered..

Similar to “keine Lust haben” (see above), but this one is stronger and much more colloquial. If you add the “mehr”/”anymore”, it means you don’t want to do something any longer

Example: “I don’t have a billy goat on this charade anymore, I’ll quit this job!”

(Ich habe keinen Bock mehr auf dieses Affentheater, ich kündige!)

Example 2: „Hector, don’t you want to play soccer with the other kids?“ – “Nope, no billy goat.”

(Hector, willst du nicht mit den anderen Kindern Fußball spielen? – Nee, keinen Bock.)

By the way, if someone is „bockig“ (“billy goat-ish”), s/he is stubborn/huffy

Bild

9. Quatsch mit Soße

“nonsense with sauce” -> nonsense

Example: “Bayern Munich will win against Dortmund” – “Ahh, nonsense with sauce! Dortmund will win at least 2-o!“

(Bayern München wird gegen Dortmund gewinnen – Ach, Quatsch mit Soße! Dortmund gewinnt mit mindestens 2:0!)

Meise

10. einen Vogel/eine Meise haben

„to have a bird/chickadee“ -> to be crazy/to be mentally irregular

Example: “You want to go outside in spite of the storm? Do you have a bird/chickadee?!”

A synonym for this idiom is “bei jemandem piept’s wohl”/”someone is making peeping noises”.

(Du willst nach draußen trotz des Sturms? Hast du nen Vogel/ne Meise?! or: Bei dir piept’s wohl!)

Bild

11. ins Fettnäpfchen treten

„to step into the grease bowl” -> to commit a faux pas/to blunder/to make a fool of oneself

Example: “Applicants can step into many grease bowls during a job interview.”

(Beim Vorstellungsgespräch kann der Bewerber in viele Fettnäpfchen treten.)

Bild

12. zwei Fliegen mit einer Klappe schlagen

„to hit two flies with one swatter” -> to kill two birds with one stone

Example: “I’ll go jogging. That way I hit two flies with one swatter: I clear my mind and keep myself in shape.”

(Ich gehe joggen. So schlage ich zwei Fliegen mit einer Klatsche: Ich bekomme den Kopf frei und halte mich fit.)

Bild

13. auf etwas Gift nehmen

„You can take poison on it!“ -> You can bet your life on it!

Example: “’Will Dortmund beat Bayern Munich tomorrow?’ – ‘You can take poison on it!’”

(„Wird Dortmund morgen gegen Bayern München gewinnen?” – „Darauf kannst du Gift nehmen!“)

Bild

Bild

14. ins Gras beißen

„to bite the grass“ -> to bite the dust

Example: “At the end of the movie the killer had to bite the grass.”

(Am Ende des Films muste der Killer ins Gras beißen.)

A synonym is „den Löffel abgeben“ -> „to cede the spoon“

Bild

Bild

15. (klar) auf der Hand liegen

“to lie (clearly) on the hand” -> to be obvious

Example: “It lies (clearly) on the hand that more and more customers purchase our products on the internet.”

(Es liegt (klar) auf der Hand, dass immer mehr Kunden unsere Produkte im Internet kaufen.)

We have another idiom with the same meaning: „to be as clear as dumpling soup”

Bild

16. auf allen Hochzeiten tanzen

“You can’t dance at all weddings” -> You can’t be in two places at the same time

Example: “You want to go to your friend’s birthday party, you want to see the soccer match, but you also have to do your homework and practice for the English test – you can’t dance at all weddings!”

(Du willst zur Geburtstagsparty deiner Freundin, du willst das Fußballspiel sehen, aber du musst auch noch deine Hausaufgaben machen und für den Englischtest lernen – man kann nicht auf allen Hochzeiten tanzen!)

Bild

Bild

17. auf dem Holzweg sein

„to be on the wood path“ -> to be mistaken

A synonym is „sich geschnitten haben“ -> „have cut oneself“

Example 1: “The people who think that the German idiom ‘have cut oneself’ has something to do with emos, are on the wood path.”

(Die Leute, die denken, dass die deutsche Redewendung “sich geschnitten haben“ etwas mit Emos zu tun hat, sind auf dem Holzweg.)

Example 2: “If you think that I’ll give you more pocket money now, you have cut yourself.”

(Wenn du denkst, dass ich dir jetzt mehr Taschengeld gebe, hast du dich geschnitten.)

I think you can’t translate these idioms with „You’re barking up the wrong tree“ because to me, the English version sounds like “You’re accusing the wrong person”, while the German idioms indicate expectations, especially the second one (see example 2). – If I’m on the wood path with the English one, let me know 😉

Bild

18. einen Kater haben

“to have a tomcat” -> to have a hangover

Example: “Do you know a good way to prevent a tomcat?”

(Weißt du ein gutes Mittel, um einen Kater vorzubeugen?)

Bild

19. jemanden/etwas durch den Kakao ziehen

„to pull somebody/something through the cocoa“ -> to make a fool of sb./sth., to ridicule sb./sth., to parody

Example: “In the comedy show they pulled many politicians through the cocoa”.

(In der Comedyshow haben sie viele Politiker durch den Kakao gezogen.)

Bild

Bild

Bild

20. jemanden auf die Palme bringen

„to drive someone up the palm tree“ -> to drive someone up the wall/to drive someone mad/to make someone’s blood boil

Example: “Intolerant and dishonest people quickly drive me up the palm tree.”

(Intolerante und unehrliche Leute bringen mich schnell auf die Palme.)

Another idiom is „You’re getting on the cookie“/“You’re getting on the alarm clock“ = to bug sb./to get on someone’s nerves

Bild

21. Alles hat ein Ende, nur die Wurst hat zwei.

“Everything has an end, only the sausage has two.”

Yup…like it says!

That’s the end of this blog entry, I hope you liked it!